MIND at Home received a total of $9.8 million in funding in  2014 through grants from the National Institute on Aging  (NIA) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services  (CMS) to test two new targeted versions of the MIND  dementia care coordination model.  Read More >>

US Senator Ben Cardin's senate floor address on June  17, 2015 describes the Johns Hopkins MIND at Home  project as the type of research that is required to  address the health care needs of the growing  population of people with Alzheimer disease and other  types of dementia. 

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Memory care coordinators at the Johns Hopkins Home Care Group and Jewish Community Services are serving as  front-line interventionists for the MIND-Plus version of  MIND at Home in the CMS funded Demonstration Project  focused on low-income people with dementia. Read More  >>

A pilot randomized controlled trial demonstrated that  providing 18 months of MIND at Home dementia care  coordination helped people with memory disorders to  remain in their homes significantly longer and have  higher quality of life than similar people who did not  receive MIND. Read More >> 

MIND AT HOME RECEIVES FUNDING FOR TWO NEW RESEARCH PROJECTS

SENATOR CARDIN COMMEMORATES JUNE AS NATIONAL ALZHEIMERS & BRAIN AWARENESS MONTH

MIND AT HOME PARTNERS WITH JOHNS HOPKINS HOME CARE GROUP & JEWISH COMMUNITY SERVICES

MEMORY CARE COORDINATION CAN ENABLE COMMUNITY RESIDING PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA TO LIVE AT HOME LONGER

MIND at Home highlight

The Mind at Home program was highlighted in Forbes. Detailing how the program works, the average amount of time people are able to live at home compared to people without care coordination, and the importance of dementia care for people in the community.

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The MIND at Home program was highlighted in the Baltimore Jewish Times highlighting the partnership between Jewish Community Services and Johns Hopkins.

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